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At Chameleon Cold-Brew, we believe our coffee is for the dreamers and do-ers; those inspired by their cold brew buzz to make the most out of every day. Throughout The Makery, we profile not only specific makers in the area, but also post information on how Chameleon Cold-Brew can benefit the maker in each and every one of us.

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Coffee Around the World

July 05, 2016
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The best thing about our cold-brew is that you can enjoy it any way you like: hot or cold, a splash of milk (or non-milk), or straight up! You can even mix it into your favorite recipes for a tasty energy boost. There are endless options when it comes to indulging in your coffee obsession, but did you know that there are also a number of coffee traditions across the globe? We compiled a list to showcase how coffee drinkers take their coffee around the world including Cuban coffee, Spanish coffee, and more! So spice up your cup of joe with coffee recipes from around the world.

 

Australia/New Zealand

America’s newest coffee obsession comes from the land down under. A Flat White is prepared by pouring microfoam (steamed milk consisting of small, fine bubbles) over a single shot of espresso. Although it’s comparable to a latte, what makes the Flat White stand out is the velvet consistency of the microfoam.

 

Spain

The Spanish culture is known for its romantic elements, including music, dance, and language. It should come as no surprise that their traditional brew is served up with a sweet taste to match. Translating in English to “coffee with honey,” the Café con Miel is a shot of espresso with steamed milk and honey, topped with cinnamon. This treat makes for a delicious light dessert or can even be served as a mid-afternoon pick me up. So enjoy a cup of Spanish coffee after a refreshing siesta!

 

Italy

 

Espresso Romano
Coffee courtesy of Sa-Ten Coffee in Austin, TX.

Un caffe per favore! If you find yourself enjoying a brew under the Tuscan sun, chances are you’ll be enjoying an Espresso Romano. A coffee as strong as the accents, the drink consists of a shot of espresso served with a slice of lemon. The lemon is rubbed on the rim of the cup, the idea being that the sourness of the lemon enhances flavors in the coffee, and removes bitter notes. It’s molto buono!

 

Cuba

If a little sweetness suits your fancy, then a coffee from Cuba might be the brew for you. A Café Cubano is made by adding one teaspoon of sugar to a shot of espresso as its being brewed. It’s typically made using darker roasts, and is regarded as a mid-afternoon standard. Drinking Café Cubano remains a prominent social and cultural activity in Cuba and Florida, especially in the regions surrounding Miami, Tampa, the Florida Keys, as well as in other Cuban-American communities like Havana on the Hudson. Enjoy this Cuban coffee delight in celebration of better Cuban-American relations.

 

Vietnam

A traditional Vietnamese coffee recipe is the Ca Phe Da. Coffee was introduced to Vietname by French colonists in the late 19th century, and quickly became a strong exporter of coffee. Because of limitations on the availability of fresh milk—the dairy farming industry was still in its infancy during the mid-19th century— the French & Vietnamese began to use sweetened condensed milk with a dark roast. Ca Phe Da are brewed individually with a small, metal French drip filter into a cup containing about a quarter, to half as much sweetened condensed milk.

 

Austria

A Wiener Melange (German for “Viennese Blend”) is a specialty coffee drink in Austria, similar to a cappuccino. The difference is sometimes assumed to be that the Melange is made with milder coffee. This brew includes one shot of espresso served in a large coffee cup, an egg yolk, and 2 tablespoons of brown sugar, topped with whipped cream.

 

France

Cafe au Lait
Coffee courtesy of Sa-Ten Coffee in Austin, TX.

The French have a phrase that goes “la vie est trop courte pour boire du mauvais café,” meaning “life is too short to drink bad coffee.” Perhaps that’s what prompted them to craft the Café au LaitThe beverage consists of half coffee and half warm frothed milk, making for an easy latte that tastes magnifique!

 

Ireland

Legend has it that this Irish classic was invented in 1942 by Captain Joe Sheridan during a miserable winter evening aboard a Pan Am flying boat. Sheridan added whiskey to passengers’ coffee to help warm them up during the awful weather. An Irish Coffee includes 1 tablespoon of brown sugar, 3 tablespoons of Irish Whiskey, and 1 cup of coffee, topped with whipped cream. This boozy brew is as tasty as they come!

Make your cup of coffee into a world traveler and enjoy coffee from around the world!